Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

PTSDPosttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a reaction which often occurs when a person has been exposed to extreme stress, trauma, or painful experiences. In other words, the person has experienced or witnessed actual or threatened bodily injury or some other extreme situation.
Click here to learn more about PTSD!

Psychotherapist / Counselor – In Home or Outpatient Therapist Shorehaven Behavioral Health, Inc – Milwaukee, WI

A leading mental health & psychotherapy clinic seeks dedicated CAREER
employees for our in-home mental health treatment departments, including
our dual disorders program. Shorehaven Behavioral Health, Inc, is an
innovative, growing company, the only FUTURE FIFTY company in our industry
(a 3-time award winner) , and BBB A+ rated. We have psychotherapist
positions for mental health and substance abuse treatment professionals.
These positions are open for Licensed Psychologists, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.
Those with SAC or CSAC MUST ALSO have a mental health license. Those with
a training license or APSW will be considered for a position of Qualified
Treatment Trainee. Continue reading

EMDR: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing

EMDR pic3

Brochure on EMDR

Did you know that most emotional problems derive from earlier life experiences? EMDR is a complex method that can assist in bringing about changes in how the nervous system processes experiences. To learn more about EMDR, please read our brochure, which can be accessed by clicking on the link above. 

EMDR pic1 EMDR pic2

Introducing Our Administrative Assistants

Rachel Niyonsaba, In-Home Administrative Assistant

Rachel Niyonsaba is our new Administrative Assistant for In-Home Services,
helping Carol Trout, Director of In-Home Services, to manage a program
which has nearly 60 staff in 24 counties.  We welcome Rachel to the
Shorehaven team.  She has been diligently working on learning all the
policies and procedures and getting up to speed on our in-home services.

 

Rachel Nionsaba's office sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alyssa Korsch is our Executive Assistant for Lynn Godec, Executive
Director, and Don Rosenberg, President.  With cheerfulness and eagerness,
Alyssa does all those important tasks that keep us going, such as trackingAlyssa Korsch
clinician productivity, coordinating repair and maintenance, setting up
the projector for meetings, managing Relias learning materials and
creating courses, coordinating psychological testing referrals, and
whatever else may come up. Recently, she spent most of the night at the
office working with a painting crew and repairmen getting the offices
fresh and lovely, and then putting up all of our new signs.

Introducing Shorehaven’s Referral Department

Most people who call Shorehaven for help will feel therapy has helped
them.  Whether the problem is with a child’s behavior, a couple problem,
anxiety, depression, substance abuse, or any number of other behavioral or
emotional problems, psychotherapy helps.

When you call Shorehaven to make your first appointment, your call will go
to our Referral Department.  Let’s introduce our Referral Coordinators:

Ryan Van Remmen
Leader In-Home Referral Coordinator

Laura Henning
In-Home Referral Coordinator

Antoinette Morrow
Outpatient Referral Coordinator

Cheronne Burks
Outpatient Referral Coordinator

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Antoinette (“Toni”) and Cheronne (“Ronnie”) set up appointments for clients who need psychotherapy, substance abuse treatment, or psychiatry.

Your Referral Coordinator will ask for all the information necessary to
start your treatment.  We will ask about your problem and your insurance.
We will check on your insurance coverage. Usually, we can make an
outpatient appointment for you while we have you on the phone.

Most clients who need help from a psychiatrist and who will be taking
medications also benefit from psychotherapy.  In order to make sure
psychiatry clients receive a thorough assessment, we will have one of our
mental health therapists do an initial assessment and recommend the best
services to help with your problems.

We hope to hear from you.  Call 414-540-2170 or write
referrals@shorehavenbhi.com.

Therapy Gem: Professionals’ Biases and Misconceptions With Substance Abuse Patients

Table of Contents: Biases and Misconceptions

Introduction and Fundamental Premises

The fundamental biases and their correlated misconceptions

I.      Substance users are not like me.

II.     Drug use always means addiction.

III.    Heavy drinking always means addiction.

IV.   All their problems are caused by their substance use.

V.    Treatment doesn’t work.

VI.   Drug users and heavy drinkers always need detox or intensive care.

VII.  Twelve-step programs are the way to go.

VIII. Any mental health professional should be able to treat such symptoms

Introduction and Fundamental Premises

subst abuse1I received a request to address staff at an HMO about substance abuse.  I was given this question: “What information about substance use and abuse will be most useful for nurse case managers?”

Thinking about that question, I knew the answer lay in one attitude that had troubled me more than any other.  Namely, too many colleagues in the mental health field believed that knowledge of substance use disorders (SUD) was outside their competence and, what’s more, they did not want to become knowledgeable about SUDs and their treatment.

Rather than learn the basics about treating substance use disorders – treatment which does work and which has applicability well beyond the treatment of SUDs — I heard many mental health professionals avoid knowledge of addictions and refer even mild cases to substance abuse professionals.  So the answer to the question “What information will be most useful?” is simply, “Before you can help change patients with substance use disorders, you first change yourself, your own attitudes, biases, and misunderstandings about substance use disorders.”

subst abuse2Over several weeks, I developed lists of such biases.  I also polled some of my colleagues who work in our Dual Disorders Department.  The result is a fairly comprehensive list of biases and misconceptions, each of which is juxtaposed with corrected information.

While I was organizing these biases by category, the list factored into what turned out to be eight domains.  A few crucial premises emerged from these ideas.  These premises summarize the main purpose and point of this presentation.

A.         The persistence of biases and misconceptions often leads to inappropriate, out-dated treatment recommendations and other potentially incorrect clinical decisions.  Accurate information AND attitudes lead to higher quality recommendations, treatments, and clinical decisions.

B.        Resolving our biases, we can connect with the substance using patient rather than distance from the patient or judge that person.  We can believe in and express hope – the foundation of motivation to change – rather than convey disapproval, judgment, or pessimism related to the patient’s lifestyle and distress.  Many of our biases derive from cultural beliefs and attitudes; therapists quite successfully overcome cultural beliefs about mental disorders, so they should easily overcome biases and misconceptions about SUDs and persons with addictions.

C.        If we judge addicts as weak and hopeless, will we do our best to help?  If we see them as people with strengths and abilities as well as with problems, we are more likely to see the best in them and do our best to help.

subst abuse3D.        Furthermore, a common fallacy is that we can cajole, guilt, criticize, admonish, confront, punish, or push a substance abuse patient into changing his or her outlook, attitudes, needs, burdens, pains, or behavior.  What we truly can change is our own outlook and attitudes. Rightly aligning ourselves, we can then better express empathy and help the other to see a hopeful vision of the changes he or she may be able to make.

Continue reading

New signs at our Brown Deer office!

This month we put up new office signs at our Brown Deer office. Lynn Godec and Alyssa Korsch helped design these unique and elegant office signs. Thank you for your very successful efforts. They look great. We also had a crew in to make repairs and paint hallways and touch up offices. Thanks to Alyssa for coordinating the project and for working third shift to oversee the work which was completed outside of normal business hours without disturbing any of our clients or staff.